Laura Petrie TV Review

Modern and Classic Television

Category: Drama

Billions

At this time (January 2016), there isn’t massive hype around Showtime’s new show, “Billions”…but there almost certainly will be. It’s already been picked up for a second season and it…

At this time (January 2016), there isn’t massive hype around Showtime’s new show, “Billions”…but there almost certainly will be. It’s already been picked up for a second season and it hasn’t even hit the water cooler conversations yet.

The timing is right for this drama. For Americans who feel wealth is out of reach except for those who pull the strings, this show pokes at the money beast that runs our modern economy and reveals that the good guys are playing games too.

Paul Giamatti, Damian Lewis, and Maggie Siff are excellent so far. The pace is quick and the barbs are meaty. Metaphors and entanglements create an electric tension without resorting to (a large amount) of intentional exposition.

It’s early, but I have a good feeling about this one. We’ll see how they handle the primary storylines in season one without losing steam. If you were a fan of the “The Big Short” you’ll likely enjoy this series. It is definitely only for adults who aren’t shocked by nudity and language, so keep that in mind.

Let me know what you think – I’d love to hear some opinions: Is this the next big show for Showtime?

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The End of Mad Men

Be sure to stop reading this article if you haven’t seen the final episode of Mad Men and you’d like to remain in the dark. For a more general view…

Be sure to stop reading this article if you haven’t seen the final episode of Mad Men and you’d like to remain in the dark. For a more general view of the show, visit my first article.


If you have been watching Mad Men since 2007, you probably have deeper feelings about the ending of the show. The characters have been in your life for a significant amount of time and losing the continuation of their stories is an emotional experience. Catching up with the show by watching it within a single year or two is no less enthralling, but may not lead to tears as easily.

If you haven’t seen the series and you’re just curious what all the fuss is about, I hope this explanation will lead you to watch someday when you’re ready for new complex characters in your life.

I never expected Don Draper’s story to wrap in an obvious way. The series often fed us subtle clues about its direction that are only clear on a second viewing (or a very sharp memory). As an example, in a scene between Sally Draper and an acquaintance, Sally lights a cigarette and the boy tells her, “smoking causes cancer.”

sally-betty-smokingSally is young enough to avoid starting a smoking habit, but not Betty Draper or the millions of other smokers of her generation. When we discovered Betty’s diagnosis in the penultimate episode, we were not as surprised as sad. Not only because we feel for the character, but because we all have people in our lives who didn’t hear the same warnings.

Some viewers made very big predictions about Don’s fate. They wanted to see him fall from a building to mimic the title sequence, or hijack a plane to make him a famous character from history. Neither of those endings would be true to the character even as dramatic as it would be for television.

I also never expected Don Draper to kill himself even though he was so often surrounded by characters who thought it was the only way out. In a meeting, Don pitched an ad for a Hawaiian hotel with a business suit on the sand and footsteps toward the sea. The clients saw it as a suicide, but Don saw it as opportunity. Don is not a man who escapes problems by accepting defeat. He always ran from the truth and expressed himself silently through his work.

In an early season, we see a flashback of Don as a child where a woman fed him soup when he was sick. She was a prostitute, but filled a motherly role that was missing from his life. Then we see the advertisement he created with the same imagery and a tagline suggesting moms always know what their kids need. Don is the epitome of someone who can create a story that people believe because it comes from his personal life.

This leads to one perspective on the finale. The last scene was the narrative equivalent of the recent gold/white or blue/black dress debate. Some people saw that dress photo as what was visible in the image, “How does this appear to me in the photo?” and others as “What are the actual colors; I don’t care how it appears in the image.”

The last scene presented us with Don Draper along the ocean, attempting meditation on top of a cliff. He develops a smile as he is surrounded by ohms. Then we see an actual television commercial – an iconic one from Coca-Cola, created by real advertising professionals in 1971.

We do not see a scene where Don Draper creates this commercial, nor do we see him share the idea with anyone else. We are left to decide: Did Don Draper return to his work and help create this commercial or is it meant as a less literal message?

There are two realities present, but we have access to the writer. Matthew Weiner could answer our question immediately, but would it really matter? (Added May 20, 2015: Matthew Weiner explains the finale) If you believe that Don Draper left advertising for a world of enlightenment, that his hug with a stranger changed his life, will you see it differently when the truth is presented?

His smile moment on the cliff could be his acceptance of the past or just an idea for an ad. Which do you see in his face? The answer could reveal your own understanding of self. The evidence suggests another truth – that Don Draper did exactly what he’s always done. He went away without explanation, had an experience, and then returned to distill it into messaging for a client.

Other characters were given storyline wrap-ups that might have felt rushed or unlikely to last. The interpretation reveals your own optimism or pessimism. Do you believe that Pete Campbell grew up and will make a better father and husband in their new Wichita home? Do you believe that Peggy and Stan will last as a romantic pair with a foundation of friendship?

joan-finaleJoan represented women who enjoy their work and don’t want to let a romantic partner prevent them from pursuing something exciting. We see her without makeup, having an honest conversation about what she wants and then starting her own business.

Throughout the series, we saw many characters change and take on new challenges, so the wrap-ups aren’t endings, they are really just the next steps for those characters. The ending we saw for Don could really just be the end of his private torment and a step toward embracing his skills as a storyteller.

A brilliant exploration of character that goes beyond the historical setting.

A brilliant exploration of character that goes beyond the historical setting.

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Super HBO Sunday

Warm up your television – Sunday, April 12 is primed to be the Super Bowl of season premieres. Silicon Valley, Game of Thrones, and Veep all return to HBO at…

Warm up your television – Sunday, April 12 is primed to be the Super Bowl of season premieres. Silicon Valley, Game of Thrones, and Veep all return to HBO at various stages of development.

Silicon Valley will be in its second season. As a sophomore, it will be tested for staying power. Viewers loved the behind-the-scenes nature of an industry that is really the “oooh ahhh” that advertising used to be. Nobody really knows what they’re doing, but we all know it’s necessary (right?)

A new game app can become an overnight success and turn into millions of real dollars. Just take a look at “Finger Derpy” which launched today for fans of the Kentucky Derby.

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App development has a certain mystique. We really don’t know how it’s done and the developers behind them are just the sort of hipster-nerds that seem to fit the role. Silicon Valley is an entertaining show with just enough additional drama to seem real and farce at the same time.

And then there’s Game of Thrones – the show that all the app developers are watching. This fantasy is moving into its sixth season and most are curious what will happen with Tyrion Lannister. Fans of Game of Thrones are drawn in to it for different reasons.

Some fans have read the books and are watching closely and crying foul when things veer away from the written word, though others proclaim that HBO has the better version. Either way, shows based on an existing story will always work hard to meet/match or break/destroy expectations.

Some predictions that I can safely make: someone will die in a dramatic way, some breasts will be bared, and fans will be glued to their couches whether they like it or not.

Speaking of politics, the light and refreshing Julia Louis-Dreyfus returns for season four of Veep. It’s senior year! Will the show have senoritis and throw all caution to the wind?

It certainly hasn’t held back so far and our fictional President Selina Meyer could be up to some satirical drama that could almost beat the 2016 election drama we have on the real news.

And finally, the news is also in your favor if you have cut the cable. HBO Now means you can finally watch all three of these great shows (and more) without being tied to a contract.

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Mad Men

Mad Men has been sculpting our modern decade for the past six years. It would be false to say its influence really started in July of 2007 when it premiered….

Mad Men has been sculpting our modern decade for the past six years. It would be false to say its influence really started in July of 2007 when it premiered. There wasn’t a massive following until it started grabbing up awards like a hungry goldfish.

As of today (April 7, 2015), Mad Men has received fifteen Emmys and four Golden Globes and the appeal isn’t a mystery to loyal viewers. The attention to historical detail is always received well by critics (including myself), so long as the writing is compelling and the acting tolerable. The show took Jon Hamm from quiet actor to a household name.

For the first four seasons, Mad Men had my highest attention. By season five, knowing the characters so well made me more critical of their sometimes dramatic actions. In that fifth season there was so much turmoil. I was ruined by the handling of Lane Pryce’s storyline in Season 5 Episode 12, “Commissions and Fees.” I didn’t need the visuals and was injured by seeing more than I thought necessary.

The brilliance of the show’s construction is evident in the handling of historical moments. There is usually a temptation to depict history from a romanticized retrospect. In “The Grown-Ups” (season three, episode 12), the show’s timeline met up with November 22, 1963. We saw how the moment of President Kennedy’s assassination played out in the world through multiple perspectives. Peggy was in bed with Duck and “slept” through the moment, Don had just finished yelling at Lane – real moments.

In the sixth season, the Apollo 11 moon landing was indeed as memorable as our relatives relay to us, but we had some alternative impressions of its significance. Sally brushed it off as wasteful to impress a boy, Don and Peggy dealt with the reality of the astronauts possibly failing and how that would impact their account.

Those are real reactions when history is unfolding in the moment. We are reminded by this television show that the passage of time and the presence of new information leads to the slow shifting of our own opinions when the present becomes the distant past. How will the younger generation feel about the events of September 11, 2001 when it is forty years in the past?

When a television show can inspire such thinking, it has done far more than entertain. Paying attention to the events of the past can go a long way toward informing our future even as we sometimes continue making the same mistakes.

As Mad Men begins final episodes, there will be a great temptation to criticize the handling of its lead characters. It’s a difficult task for writers to craft an ending when each viewer relates in different ways and wants to see their favorites make the choices they would. In the end, we have to accept them for who they have been crafted to be.

If you haven’t seen Mad Men, it will be around when you’re ready for it. Be sure you’re mentally ready as well.

Will the series finale be five star-worthy?

Will the series finale be five star-worthy?

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Better Call Saul

There are only two things you need to know about Better Call Saul: 1) You need to watch it, and 2) Julie Ann Emery is a kick-ass Betsy Kettleman. Bob…

There are only two things you need to know about Better Call Saul: 1) You need to watch it, and 2) Julie Ann Emery is a kick-ass Betsy Kettleman.

Bob Odenkirk has been on my must-watch list since the days of Mr. Show on HBO. His work as Jimmy McGill is very fulfilling for his longtime fans who remember him as say…Don Pratt for instance (see video below). These are the days before Saul Goodman, but with hints at the full origin story that we didn’t even know we’d love so much.

Julie Ann Emery is officially my pick for rising star thanks to her genius portrayal of Betsy Kettleman. We have seen her in some great shows and movies, including the recent Fargo series as Ida Thurman. The writing is surely to be credited, but the choices Emery makes with facial expression and delivery are simply killer.

Cinematically, the show is as delicious as all Breaking Bad fans might have expected. I’m happy to see Kelley Dixon as editor. Scenes that take us even further back in Jimmy’s life are applied very skillfully within the context of the present.

When I watch new television, there has to be a “Got Me” moment. That’s the moment when I say, “Oh yeah…this show has it.” For Breaking Bad, it was when [spoiler] Walt blew up that guy’s car at the gas station. That was the Got Me. Better Call Saul’s Got Me involved [non-spoiler] Betsy Kettleman racing upstairs after something was revealed.

This show had the potential to careen wildly into dangerous spin-off cliché territory. Thus far, the team has shown that their success on Breaking Bad was no fluke and I can’t wait to see where the next seasons go (oh yeah, there will be many more).

Verdict: This is a show you watch it when it airs. Monday nights at 10/9c on AMC

Will it become a classic?

Will it become a classic?

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